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What Is Cloud Computing? Everything You Need To Know?

China iTech Ghana
Tuesday, September 28, 2021 | views Last Updated 2021-09-28T21:52:14Z
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The cloud is one of the most important innovations of the information era. Not only does the cloud help businesses reduce their IT costs but it also helps the rest of us be more productive whether we’re in the office or at home. The cloud also enables businesses to lower costs and knowledge barriers that once prevented them from leveraging the latest and greatest technology.


On Demand Computing

The cloud refers to web-connected servers and software that users can access and use over the internet. As a result, you don’t have to host and manage your own hardware and software. It also means that you can access these systems anywhere that you have access to the internet.


You come across cloud computing every day. When you check your Gmail inbox, look at a picture on your Dropbox account, or watch your favorite shows on Netflix, you’re accessing information that is located on a server somewhere in the world. Those emails, video files, or whatever else you need are not being stored on your computer, but you can access them quickly, easily, and cheaply thanks to modern cloud computing technology.

 

Public, Private and Hybrid Cloud

There are three distinct deployment models for the cloud: private, public, and hybrid. Ultimately, all three models will grant users anytime, anywhere access to the files and applications that drive their business. The difference lies in how they do it. The type of cloud that you should deploy for your business depends on several factors, such as what you are using your cloud environment for, regulations that dictate how data can be stored and transmitted, and other considerations.


Private Cloud

Private clouds serve a single entity. Some businesses build and maintain their own environment, while others rely on service providers to handle that task. Either way, private clouds are expensive, and are antithetical to the economic and IT labor productivity benefits of the cloud. However, since some businesses are subject to stricter data privacy and regulatory forces than others, private clouds are their only option.

Public Cloud

Public clouds are hosted by cloud service providers, and distributed over the open internet. Public clouds are the most popular and least expensive of the three, and frees customers from having to purchase, manage, and maintain their own IT infrastructure.

Hybrid Cloud

Hybrid cloud is the combination of one or more public and private clouds. Let’s say you work in an industry that must adhere to very strict data privacy regulations. While you don’t want to host data that is subject to regulation in the cloud, you want to access it as if it was. At the same time, you want to deploy your CRM in the cloud, through which you can access data stored in your private cloud. In these cases, using a hybrid cloud makes the most sense.

Everything as a Service

There are several layers that make up the cloud “stack”. A stack refers to the combination of frameworks, tools, and other components that make up cloud computing’s under-the-hood infrastructure. This includes Infrastructure as a Service (IaaS), Platform as a Service (PaaS), and Software as a Service (SaaS) modules. These services provide customers with varying levels of control and responsibility in their cloud environment.

Infrastructure as a Service

With IaaS, the customer is responsible for managing everything from the OS and middleware, to the data and applications. The service provider handles other tasks, such as virtualization, servers, storage and networking responsibilities. Customers are charged based on the amount of resources they use, like CPU cycles, memory, bandwidth and more. Examples of IaaS products include Amazon Web Services and Microsoft Azure.

Some businesses use IaaS as part of their “lift and shift” strategy, wherein they migrate their data and applications to the cloud. For example, a small business may migrate their file, email, and web servers to the cloud, rather than hosting them on-premises.

Others may use IaaS as part of their disaster recovery plan. Cloud service providers store redundant backups across several data centers. Even if there is a problem in one of their data centers, your data is safely stored somewhere else. This provides businesses with the ability to recover their data should it get ransomed, accidentally deleted, or destroyed by a flood, fire, or other natural disasters.

Platform as a Service

PaaS solutions provide customers with a place to develop, test and host their own applications. The customer is responsible for managing their own data and software, and the service provider handles everything else. With PaaS solutions, you don’t have to worry about software updates, operating systems, or storage needs. PaaS customers pay for whichever computing resources they consume. Examples of PaaS solutions include Google App Engine or SAP Cloud.

Software as a Service

In the SaaS model, customers purchase licenses to use an application hosted by the provider. Unlike IaaS and PaaS models, customers typically purchase annual or monthly subscriptions per user, rather than how much of a particular computing resource they consumed. Some examples of popular SaaS solutions would be Microsoft 365, Dropbox, and DocuSign.


SaaS solutions are great for small businesses that lack the financial and/or IT resources to deploy the latest and greatest solutions. Not only do you skirt the costs and labor concerns that come with deploying your own hardware, but you also don’t have to worry about the high upfront costs of software. Plenty of large businesses have also enjoyed the flexibility and agility afforded by SaaS solutions. In summary, nobody in your organization has to worry about managing software updates, because your software is always up to date.

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